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FPRI News

For Expert Commentary on the Iran Nuclear Deal

The Foreign Policy Research Institute is making its scholars available to provide expert commentary on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action reached by the P5+1 - the United States, the United Kingdom, France, China, Russia, Germany, and the European Union - and the Islamic Republic of Iran on July 14, 2015.

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FPRI's Ed Turzanski Quoted in nj.com Article on the State's Terrorism Law

Ed Turzanski"While many are not commonly used, they retain an important function for states that were suddenly faced with the possibility that their governments and infrastructures could be vulnerable to attack."

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FPRI's Ed Turzanski Interviewed on Talk Radio 1210 About the Iran Deal

Ed Turzanski"If every day is a deadline, there is no deadline. So, if it continues to shift then you know there really is no hard point. The purpose of a deadline is to compel people with the lash of necessity and the only one lashing themselves with necessity is the Obama administration."

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FPRI's Jacques deLisle Cited in Knowledge@Wharton Article on Corruption in China

Jacques deLisle"To the extent that there is corruption, it tends to hide. It is hard to know that you have found out what you need to know…. China is not a terribly transparent place.”

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FPRI's Ron Granieri Teaches About German-American Relations for The American Council on Germany

Ronald Granieri"These audio podcasts (which range in length from five to ten minutes) offer a brief introduction to some of the most important events, individuals, and themes in the history of Germany and of German-American Relations, and are intended to spur debate and conversation among current and former Young Leaders as well as all friends of the ACG and anyone interested in the historical roots of the contemporary relati

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FPRI's Frank Hoffman Quoted in Washington Post on Hybrid Warfare

Frank G. Hoffman"This kind of warfare transcends traditional notions of one military confronting another by incorporating both conventional and unconventional forces, information warfare such as propaganda, as well as economic measures to undermine an enemy...The critique was, and still is, that America's view of war is overly simplified...We think of things in black-and-white terms."

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FPRI's Vanessa Neumann Quoted in The Daily Signal on US-Cuba Relations

Vanessa Neumann“The embargo, or as the Cubans call it, ‘the blockade,’ was not working...It’s a chance for the U.S. to influence Cuba’s policy a lot more through engagement than through isolation. You need to give people something to lose or some relationship to damage in order for them to care about what you want or what you can achieve.”

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Presenting the Summer 2015 Orbis

Our summer issue of Orbis leads with an article by Derek Reveron and Nick Gvosdev arguing that there is an enduring domestic consensus about America’s role in the world, which arises from a fundamental continuity in U.S. interests. They contend that since World War II, the United States has tended to fill security voids in order to ensure that the international system remains functional. But they say, although future U.S. grand strategy will be global and multilateral, it will be much more selective than it is today. Richard Hooker examines U.S. grand strategy and contends that today’s grand strategy rests on traditional foundations that were visible even at the beginning of the American Republic. No matter how much it may be debated, U.S. grand strategy remains remarkably consistent from decade to decade.

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FPRI's Mark Moyar Reviews Dominic Tierney's New Book: The Right Way to Lose a War

"Perhaps the United States can withstand continued losses a while longer, but a nation content to be a loser will not long enjoy allies who will fight or enemies who will show restraint."  

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FPRI's Lawrence Husick Quoted in Daily Signal on Chinese Involvement in the Recent Cyber Attack

Lawrence Husick"In general, U.S.-China relations will suffer. However, it’s very difficult to predict any particular way in which they will be worse because there are always trade-offs."

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