Foreign Policy Research Institute A Nation Must Think Before it Acts Why “Best Military Advice” is Bad for the Military—and Worse for Civilians
Why “Best Military Advice” is Bad for the Military—and Worse for Civilians

Why “Best Military Advice” is Bad for the Military—and Worse for Civilians

Abstract

This article contends that “best military advice” is a problematic construct for both the military and civilians alike. Yet, the increasing resonance of this construct across the Joint Force cannot—and should not—be summarily dismissed. Instead, it merits reflection about why the term has grown in popularity, how its continued use is influencing the development of defense strategy, and perhaps above all, how it will affect American civil-military relations. As best military advice infuses the U.S. military, it will increasingly become normalized and held up as desirable, particularly among the younger generation. Short of serious near-term steps to neutralize this construct, its deleterious influence will only increase.

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