Foreign Policy Research Institute A Nation Must Think Before it Acts Differing Viewpoints on the Japanese Occupation of Korea

Differing Viewpoints on the Japanese Occupation of Korea

New York State Standards:
Standard 2 – World History, Key Ideas 1, 2, 3, and 4
Standard 5 – Civics, Citizenship and Government, Key Ideas 1 and 4

Common Core Curriculum Standards:
Reading 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Writing 1, 2,4, 5, 9

– Students will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension.
– Students will be able to determine the main idea of primary source and secondary source documents.
– Students will be able to use critical thinking skills to argue a viewpoint.
– Students will be able to understand multiple perspectives.
– Students will be able to demonstrate world historical context.
– Students will be able to analyze and interpret statistics
– Students will be able to evaluate a written piece.
– Students will gain understanding of the AP World DBQ rubric.
– Students will be able to learn content about the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1910-1945.
– Students will be able to hone the skills of questioning sources and analyzing point of view and bias.
– Students will be able to think like historians and identify and explain a missing voice that would help provide more insight into the dilemma posed.

OPTION 1 – Day one-two
1. Students would have been given the evening at home or 10 minutes in class on the previous day to read through the documents and start to organize their thoughts by crafting comments in the packet in regards to point of view/bias and grouping.
2. Students would be provided with a forty minute class period to write the DBQ essay.

OPTION 2 – Day One or at Home
1. Students would have been given the evening at home or 10 minutes in class on the previous day to read through the documents and start to organize their thoughts by crafting comments in the packet in regards to point of view/bias and grouping.
2. Students would be asked to complete the skill building sheet where they craft a thesis statement, explain bias in 4 documents, and identify and explain a missing voice.

OPTION 3
1. Students would have been given the evening at home or 10 minutes in class on the previous day to read through the documents and start to organize their thoughts by crafting comments in the packet in regards to point of view/bias and grouping.
2. Students could write the essay in class, or at home, or not at all. The teacher may just want the students to have familiarity with the documents before they review the sample essay.
3. The model essay will be shared with students and they could be asked to evaluate it using the rubric on their own, or with a partner.
4. The annotated essay would then be shared for students to compare their assessment with the teacher’s version.
5. Discussion of findings will be shared with the whole class and the teacher will highlight the various components.

Adaptation for global history regent’s level:
Students would be provided the documents along with scaffolding questions to complete. Students would answer the questions and then write a Regents style essay.

Author
  • Christina Cone
  • Smithtown High School West
Related History Institute
Grade Level
  • High School: 10
Time Frame
  • Anywhere from 0-3 class periods (depending on options selected)

If you have any questions about this lesson plan, or if you wish to contact the author, please email us at [email protected]