Foreign Policy Research Institute A Nation Must Think Before it Acts Announcing the 2018 Templeton Fellows at FPRI

Announcing the 2018 Templeton Fellows at FPRI

  • February 5, 2018

Announcing the 2018 Templeton Fellows at FPRI

  • February 5, 2018

We are pleased to announce the selection of five Templeton Fellows for 2018, reflecting diverse areas of interest and diverse perspectives on international affairs.  All have contributed effort to FPRI in the past but the fellowship will enable FPRI to elevate their level of participation.  

 

Jeremy Black

Jeremy Black, professor of history at Exeter University, is the author of over 100 books on military and diplomatic history, making him arguably the most prolific historian in the world. He is also a popular lecturer, both in the United States and abroad; in Philadelphia, he delivered the annual Lincoln Day lecture at the Union League in 2017 and also addressed the Museum of American Jewish History.  His books include Maps of Wars: Mapping Conflict through the Centuries (2017) , a nominee for Military History Monthly’s 2018 book award; Air Power: A Global History (2016), winner of the MHM 2017 Bronze Award; and Rethinking World War Two: The Conflict and Its Legacy (2015). His classic FPRI essays include “The Geopolitics of the American Revolution” and “Islam and the West in Historical Perspective.” His essays will appear regularly in FPRI’s American Review of Books, Blogs, and Bull. 


Nada BakosNada Bakos

Nada Bakos,  a former CIA analyst, became the Chief Targeting Officer tracking one of the world’s most wanted terrorists, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (killed in 2006 in a targeted strike conducted by US military forces).  She was featured in the PBS Frontline  “The Secret History of ISIS” and the Emmy-award winning HBO documentary  Manhunt, and is a National Security analyst for CNN. Ms. Bakos has worked with C-level corporate executives, senior level government officials, and front-line-technical teams to help them understand the business or security-related context to deploying new processes and technologies. Her upcoming memoir, The Targeter, is coming out from Little, Brown.  She will be featured in our Main Line Briefings in February.


Dominic Tierney

Dominic Tierney, associate professor of political science at Swarthmore College, is a contributing writer at The Atlantic.  His books include The Right Way to Lose a War: America in an Age of Unwinnable Conflicts (Little, Brown, 2015) and How We Fight: Crusades, Quagmires, and the American Way of War (Little, Brown, 2010).  His writings have appeared in The New York TimesThe Los Angeles TimesInternational Security, and Orbis, among other outlets, and he has appeared on CNN and MSNBC. He received his Ph.D. in international politics from Oxford University, and has held fellowships at the Mershon Center at Ohio State University, the Olin Institute at Harvard University, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  Earlier this year, he addressed our public forum on “Do Think Tanks Matter?” and will address other FPRI forums throughout the year.



Ronald Granieri

Ronald Granieri is Executive Director of FPRI’s Center for the Study of America and the West, Editor of the Center’s E-publication The American Review of Books, Blogs, and Bulland popular host of Geopolitics with Granieri, a monthly series of events for FPRI Members.   He is the author of The Ambivalent Alliance: Konrad Adenauer, the CDU/CSU, and the West, 1949-1966 (Oxford and New York: Berghahn Books, 2003), and is currently completing a book entitled: The Fall and Rise of German Christian Democracy for Oxford University Press.    A cartoon version of Granieri stars in the new series of FPRI primers for students on topics in American history and foreign policy.  He is a specialist in Contemporary German and International History with degrees from both Harvard and the University of Chicago, and has taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, Syracuse University, Furman University, and the University of Tubingen.  Be sure to peek at his classic FPRI essay “The Fall of the Berlin Wall, the Power of Individuals, and the Unpredictability of  History.”


 

Edward Turzanski Edward A. Turzanski

Edward A. Turzanski, co-chair of FPRI’s Center for the Study of Terrorism, is an outstanding civic leader in Philadelphia.  He appears frequently on local and national media, including as a regular on 6ABC’s Inside Story on Sunday mornings in Philadelphia.  He is Scholar in Residence at the American Institute for History Education, a board member and Scholar-in Residence at the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia, President of the National Aeronautic Space Training and Research Center Foundation, Vice President of the Union League of Philadelphia,  Senior Scholar of the Thomas Jefferson Medical College Department of Public Health, and a board member of Aria Health System.   He served with the U.S. Intelligence Community in postings throughout the Middle East, Central Asia and Eastern Europe during the Reagan Administration; and he was a member of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Anti-Terror Advisory Committee throughout the George W. Bush Administration.