Teaching the Nuclear Age

Date : Sat., March 28, 2009 to Sun., March 29, 2009 Category : Butcher History Institute

Over 60 years ago, the nuclear age began with weapons that could destroy a city in a single strike. Although nuclear weapons have not been used since their first and only use in 1945, the prospect that nuclear weapons will find their way into the hands of terrorists or rogue regimes is arguably the greatest threat to the world today. This weekend-long program will enable teachers to understand— and teach— the nuclear age with historical perspective.

Teaching the Nuclear Age Conference Summary by Trudy Kuehner

Topics and Speakers

Welcoming Remarks

03/28/2009 - 8:50 AM to 9:00 AM
Walter A. McDougall

Co-Chair - Madeleine and W.W. Keen Butcher History Institute

Alloy-Ansin Professor of International Relations, University of Pennsylvania

Related Article(s):

Welcoming Remarks for Teaching the Nuclear Age

Source Books for Teachers on Teaching the Nuclear Age

What Every American Needs to Know about Nuclear Weapons

03/28/2009 - 09:00 AM to 10:15 AM
Jeremy Bernstein

Professor Emeritus, Stevens Institute of Technology

Author of “Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know”

Related Material(s):

What You Always Wanted To Know About Nuclear Weapons But Were Afraid To Ask (PDF)

Related Multimedia:

What Every American Needs to Know about Nuclear Weapons (audio)

What Every American Needs to Know about Nuclear Weapons (video)

The Role of Nuclear Weapons in International Politics

03/28/2009 - 10:30 AM to 11:45 AM
Andrew L. Ross

Professor and Director, Center for Science, Technology, and Policy, University of New Mexico

Related Material(s):

The Role of Nuclear Weapons in International Politics (PDF)

Related Article(s):

The Role of Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: A Strategic Perspective

Related Multimedia:

The Role of Nuclear Weapons in International Politics (audio)

The Role of Nuclear Weapons in International Politics (video)

Harry Truman and the Decision to Drop the Bomb: The Debate Among Historians

03/28/2009 - 1:30 PM to 2:45 PM
Richard B. Frank

Author of “Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire”

Related Article(s):

Ending the Pacific War: Harry Truman and the Decision To Drop the Bomb

Related Multimedia:

Harry Truman and the Decision to Drop the Bomb: The Debate Among Historians (audio)

Harry Truman and the Decision to Drop the Bomb: The Debate Among Historians (video)

The Nevada Test Site in History and Today

03/28/2009 - 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Troy E. Wade II

Chairman, Nevada Test Site Historical Foundation

Related Multimedia:

The Nevada Test Site in History and Today (audio)

The Nevada Test Site in History and Today (video)

The Nuclear Age in the Classroom

03/28/2009 - 7:30 PM
Paul Dickler

Senior Fellow - Wachman Center for Civic and International Literacy

Linda Miller

Trustee, Nevada Test Site Historical Foundation

Related Material(s):

The Nuclear Age in the Classroom Slides (PDF)

Oral History Activity (DOC)

Oral History Bios (DOC)

The Question of Arms Control in the Nuclear Era: A Panel Discussion

03/28/2009 - 8:30 AM to 9:45 AM
Avis T. Bohlen

Former Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control

James Goodby

Former Arms Control Negotiator

Adam Garfinkle

Moderator

Editor, The American Interest

Related Article(s):

Arms Control in the Cold War

Arms Control Since the Cold War

Related Multimedia:

The Question of Arms Control in the Nuclear Era: A Panel Discussion (audio)

The Question of Arms Control in the Nuclear Era: A Panel Discussion (video)

Does Nuclear Deterrence Apply in the Age of Terrorism

03/28/2009 - 10:00 AM to 11:15 AM
Adam Garfinkle

Editor, The American Interest

Related Article(s):

Does Nuclear Deterrence Apply in the Age of Terrorism?

Related Multimedia:

Does Nuclear Deterrence Apply in the Age of Terrorism (audio)

Does Nuclear Deterrence Apply in the Age of Terrorism (video)

Reflections on Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War

03/28/2009 - 11:30 AM to 12:45 PM
Hans Mark

Professor and John J. McKetta Centennial Energy Chair in Engineering, University of Texas at Austin

Related Multimedia:

Reflections on Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War (audio)

Reflections on Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War (video)

What Participants Receive: 

Forty participants will be selected to receive:

  • free room and board;
  • assistance in designing curriculum and special projects based on the History Institute;
  • stipends of $300 for well-developed lesson plans for posting on our website that effectively utilize the experience of the weekend conference, or documentation of in-service presentations based on the weekend;
  • partial travel reimbursements (up to $300) for participants outside the vicinity of the conference center;
  • subscription to Orbis, FPRI’s journal of world affairs; E-Notes, FPRI’s weekly bulletin; and Footnotes, FPRI’s bulletin for high school teachers.
  • a certificate of participation in a program offering 12 hours of instruction. In addition, for those interested, college credit is available for a small fee through our cooperating institution, Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

To Apply:

Please email to lux@fpri.org a resume and a short statement describing your current teaching or professional assignments, your reasons for wanting to attend, and how your students or school district will benefit from your participation. NOTE: At the time of application, you are asked to make a commitment either to prepare a curriculum unit based on the weekend or to do in-service activities based on the weekend. Schools with a school membership in FPRI’s Wachman Center are guaranteed one place at one History Institute weekend per year. For information about school membership, contact lux@fpri.org.

The Foreign Policy Research Institute, founded in 1955, is a non-partisan, non-profit 501(c)(3) organization devoted to bringing the insights of scholarship to bear on the development of policies that advance U.S. national interests. In the tradition of our founder, Ambassador Robert Strausz-Hupé, Philadelphia-based FPRI embraces history and geography to illuminate foreign policy challenges facing the United States. more about FPRI »

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