Foreign Policy Research Institute A Nation Must Think Before it Acts The Legacy of Taiwan’s Lee Teng-hui

Taiwan

Round Table
August 7, 2020

The Legacy of Taiwan’s Lee Teng-hui

On July 30, 2020, former President Lee Teng-hui of Taiwan passed away at the age of 97. He had served as vice president to President Chiang Ching-kuo, the son of Chiang Kai-shek, before becoming president himself. Lee was the first Taiwan-born president and also the first democratically elected president of the Republic of China, earning him the nickname of “Mr. Democracy.” His tenure as president saw great change and transformation in Taiwan: he finished Taiwan’s long path to democracy and ended the decades-long martial law. To evaluate his legacy, Thomas J. Shattuck, Managing Editor and Asia Program Research Associate at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, and Jacques deLisle, Asia Program Director at FPRI, discuss Lee’s role in making Taiwan what it is today.

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Analysis
July 15, 2020

Whither Hong Kong: Beijing Imposes a “National Security Law”

The recent imposition of the National Security Law is by far Beijing’s most decisive effort to bring the less-than-ruly inhabitants of Hong Kong into line with central government policies. This new level of control over the former British colony did not come about easily. The strength and persistence of Hong Kong residents’ demonstrations against Beijing’s ongoing efforts to curb their civil liberties took most observers, and perhaps even the participants, by surprise. This latest, and like its predecessors, largely leaderless movement with its motto “be like water” lasted more than a year, with nightly news footage of exploding tear gas canisters, bloodied demonstrators, and extensive property damage beamed around the world. With the new National Security Law, Hong Kong’s future remains uncertain.

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(Source: Taiwan Presidential Office)
Analysis
July 1, 2020

Taiwan Finds an Unexpected New Friend in Somaliland

COVID-19 seemed to change the narrative around Taiwan: from a nation whose existence is often characterized as standing on the edge of a knife to one that capably and effectively handled the pandemic with fewer than 10 deaths. Before the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged the globe, the only time that most people would hear about Taiwan was in stories about China pressing it militarily or diplomatically. Since 2016, Taiwan has lost a handful of its remaining diplomatic allies (which now numbers at 15) to China, but Taiwan just announced a surprising piece of news: it has gained, not lost, a “friend.”

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Round Table
May 28, 2020

Beyond COVID-19, Part 13: Chaos in Hong Kong, A Georgian Anniversary, and Military Moves in Libya

Maia and Aaron are back with us this week! Last week, we took a little detour to discuss the inauguration of President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan. It’s worth a read if you’d like to learn more about Taiwan’s COVID-19 response efforts and the challenges that the country will face over the next four years. We’re back to our normal discussion about all things Asia, Eurasia, Nat. Sec, and Middle East. As Aaron mentions, there is a lot a convergence on a number of issues we’ve been discussing over the last couple of months.

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(Source: Taiwan Presidential Office)
Round Table
May 20, 2020

Taiwan’s Tsai Ing-wen Begins Her Second Term amid a Pandemic

On May 20, 2020, President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan began her second term in office. In a more subdued ceremony than is the norm, Tsai took the office of oath, along with new Vice President Lai Ching-te. Her second inaugural address focused on the COVID-19 pandemic and Taiwan’s response; it also set forth Tsai’s priorities for the next four years. In her speech, Tsai said, “No matter the difficulties we face, we can always count on our democracy, our solidarity, and our sense of responsibility towards each other to help us overcome challenges, weather difficult times, and stand steadfast in the world.”

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Round Table
May 14, 2020

Beyond COVID-19, Part 12: Taiwan’s International Stock Rises as Turkey’s Falls

Mid-May is upon us. I would like to thank our readers who have loyally read our weekly discussions throughout the pandemic. I hope you all are healthy and safe, and continue to stay the course in staying at home. This week, Aaron joins me for a riveting discussion on important developments related to China, Taiwan, Turkey, the F-35 jet program, and the ongoing Marine reforms—Maia is off this week sunbathing in Tahiti.

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Analysis
May 13, 2020

Taiwan and the WHO in 2020: A Novel Virus and Viral Politics

The World Health Assembly (WHA)—the annual plenary session of the 194 members of the World Health Organization (WHO)—convenes on May 18, 2020. The perennial question of Taiwan’s participation and access has again become especially prominent and contentious, largely because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the novel coronavirus has enhanced the arguments—and international support—for restoring Taiwan’s access and, with it, providing a boost to Taiwan’s international stature and, in turn, its security. But Beijing’s opposition and other factors create challenges more daunting than those that Taipei faced when it began its earlier eight-year run of WHA attendance. The push for Taiwan’s regaining engagement and participation is a case of what should be an irresistible force meeting what may be an immovable object.

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Round Table
May 7, 2020

Beyond COVID-19, Part 11: Political Shake-up in Ukraine and Baseball Returns in Asia

Congratulations to our readers: you made it to May! Celebrate the small victories, and do something special for yourself today (aside from reading today’s titillating conversation, of course). Some states are beginning a slow re-opening, but please continue to stay safe, especially if you’re going to be partaking in activities in which others will be near you. Maia Otarashvili and Aaron Stein are back after taking off last week, when I had a great discussion with our Black Sea Fellow Bob Hamilton. You can read that here. We’re back to discussing all things Asia, Eurasia, and the Middle East. There have been plenty of developments around the world that I know Maia and Aaron are anxious to discuss!

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Round Table
April 23, 2020

Beyond COVID-19, Part 9: Space Launches and Growing Authoritarian Crackdowns

The end of April is in sight. Most of us have been working from home and living under quarantine and social distancing policies for six weeks now, but somehow, April’s almost over. Some misguided individuals are now protesting to end the social distancing policies, which could increase the number of cases and add an unnecessary stress on healthcare workers. So, simply put: don’t be stupid and stay home. Important non-COVID developments are still happening around the world; some countries are making controversial decisions while the world is focused on the pandemic, so we continue to keep you up to date on important developments from around the world.

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Analysis
April 14, 2020

The Streisand Effect Gets Geopolitical: China’s (Unintended) Amplification of Taiwan

The Streisand Effect, referring to “the act of trying to suppress information but simply making it more widespread as a result,” was coined in 2005. The term is named after singer Barbara Streisand because in 2003, Streisand sued photographer Kenneth Adelman for taking a photo of her home in Malibu while he was documenting California’s coast. Apparently, before the lawsuit was filed, the photograph had been only downloaded six times. Instead of leaving well enough alone, Streisand launched a cultural zeitgeist with her lawsuit. The explosion of social media since the early 2000s has made the Streisand Effect seem like a daily occurrence: Beyoncé, Pippa Middleton, and Tom Cruise have all fallen victim of trying to suppress something only for it to go viral.

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